American of these sportsmanship skills way early in

American society has always been an active participator in sports. Sports are more of a culture or way of life than they are just co-curricular activities. With numerous selections to choose from, most Americans are involved in sports directly or indirectly: in the field or in the benches. This is clearly seen in the large support of sports whether it is in a high school game or a major league match.

            This culture is instilled in the early stages of life of an American child. With the support of parents and community at large, most elite sportsmen learned to play when they started learning how to walk and talk. In most communities there are facilities and institutions promoting the growth of these sportsmanship skills way early in life. This promotes the drive and addition of skills necessary to handle the sports. This is always a wonderful manner by which physical fitness may be achieved as well promoting healthy sportsmen. Co-curricular activity is a large part of the school system. Whether it be compulsory physical fitness at the gym or involvement in different sports, it always plays a crucial step in the formation of all round students. There are those who develop tremendous passion for sports and find themselves playing in college and later becoming elite class athletes or professionals.

            For those who do not participate directly, it is not an unusual thing to find whole families enjoying an evening game in front of a T.V. set uninterrupted cheering, jeering and commenting over the game as if they were actually in the game themselves. The same competitiveness observed by the rival teams is the same that is witnessed in cases like these where different family members might vouch for opposing playing teams. Whether the participation of sports is more leisure or full-time, it is clear that sports is a large part of the society’s culture. It unites, challenges and encourages commitment and drive.