Child 42 percent gap in SAT scores between

Child poverty has been a huge issue in America, and has been for a long time, yet this issue has not been resolved. Therefore, what we are doing as a nation is not working. Child poverty leads to immense issues in the lives of these kids, in both their mental, and physical health. “Executive function skills such as impulse control, emotional regulation, attention management, prioritization of tasks, and working memory draw on a limited supply of mental energy.” (www.scilearn.com ).According to the Connecticut Commission on Families, brain development lags are 1.3 more frequent for kids living under the poverty line, and five percent of kids living under the poverty line have lags in the development of their brain (www.dosomething.org ). Also, according to Princeton University, and published in The Future of Our Children, the amount of kids in low-income families with learning disabilities is 8.3 percent. (education.seattlepi.com) Children feel alienated from society; suffer insecurities because of their socioeconomic status; fear the consequences of their poverty; endure feelings of powerlessness; and are angry at society’s inability to aid in their struggles. (www.childfund.org) When poverty and hunger is severe, it can lead to malnutrition. Even if people eat, they can still face malnutrition because the foods that they are eating may not have enough nutrients in them. (kidshealth.org ) “Today more than ever, education remains the key to escaping poverty, while poverty remains the biggest obstacle to education.” There is a 42 percent gap in SAT scores between students living in high income families vs students living in low-income families.  (www.scilearn.com ) 40% of kids living in poverty are not ready for elementary school. 30% or less kids in families with low incomes go to a four year school, and out of the kids that did go to a four year school, less than half of them graduate. (www.dosomething.org) Out of the children that are raised in poverty that go to high school, only 30% of them finish. (www.childfund.org) “Low-income students repeat grades at a rate of 28.8 percent compared to 14.1 percent of higher income families; 11.9 percent of low-income students are expelled or suspended from school, compared to 6.1 percent of higher income students”. In 2008, the high school dropout rate for low-income kids was 8.7 percent. It was 2 percent for families with higher-incomes. (education.seattlepi.com) (American Psychological Association) Education encourages stability, and can help children get through hard times. (www.globalpartnership.org) 59% of parents said that during the past year, that they did not have the amount of money needed to buy more food, and that the food that they could manage to but did not stay for very long. 23% of families earning low-incomes have had to make their kids meals smaller because they do not have enough money. 34% of parents said that they have difficulty in giving healthy and nutritious food to their kids because they do not have the money to pay for it. 42% of kids living in families with low-incomes are upset because of not having a sufficient amount of food to eat. On the contrary, 41% feel mad about it. 27% of kids living in families with low-incomes think that living this way will hurt their future. 59% of kids from families with low-incomes said that they are hungry when they get to school. 46% of kids from families with low-incomes said that being hungry negatively affects how they do in school, and 12% of these kids said that when they try to do their homework at night, they cannot focus because they are so hungry. 75% (3 out of 4) teachers said that they notice kids at school who are hungry when they arrive everyday, and only 46% of theses kids come to school on a regular basis. 92% of teachers are worried about how their students hunger can change how they perform in school. 80% of teachers notice that kids that do not have a sufficient amount of food cannot focus, and they lack concentration. 76% of teachers notice that kids that do not have a sufficient amount of food have worse grades in school. 62% of teachers notice that kids that do not have a sufficient amount of food have more issues with their actions, and how they behave. 47% of teachers notice that kids that do not have a sufficient amount of food get sick more often, and overall are significantly less healthy than others.(www.nokidhungry.org)