Ishana consumer of energy. While there are many

                                                          Ishana M. Perera                                                    Environmental Science 2                                             University of Texas at San Antonio

According to the EIA, energy is the ability to work. There are many kinds of energy in the world. Some are Heat, Light, Motion, Electrical, Chemical, Nuclear energy, Gravitational. It can be divided in to two categories as renewable and non-renewable. Renewable and nonrenewable energy sources can be used as primary energy sources to produce useful energy such as heat or used to produce secondary energy sources such as electricity. Renewable energy is an energy source that can be easily replenished. USA and China are two of the biggest countries that use Energy the most.

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Decades ago the fastest growing economy was USA but now China has become the world’s most populous country with a fast-growing economy. Which has made China the world’s biggest consumer of energy. While there are many energy resources used across the world, in USA the main energy resources are Petroleum, natural gas, coal, renewable energy, and nuclear electric power. In China the main energy resource is coal and they also use petroleum, natural gas, and nuclear power in order to support the growing population.

In United States the Crude oil imports have significantly reduced and also is now exporting natural gas instead of importing it. United States is also first in worldwide reserves of coal, sixth in worldwide reserves of natural gas and eleventh in worldwide reserves of oil. Petroleum has become the leading source of energy as it accounts for almost 40% of the energy. Most of the petroleum is used for transportation. The next two highest sources of energy, like petroleum, are non-renewable and include natural gas and coal. Only a very small percentage of our energy comes from renewable energy sources such as wood and water. 35% of the natural gas is used for power generation. On the other hand, 76% of the residential and commercial energy needs are met by natural gas.

China has risen to the top ranks in global energy demand over the past few years and is the world’s second-largest oil consumer and net importer of crude oil behind the United States. The U.S. EIA reports that China is the world’s largest net importer of petroleum and other liquids, in part because of China’s rising oil consumption. China uses natural gases as well. It is the world’s largest coal producer, consumer, and importer.

And no-one has used coal on the scale of China. Today it consumes half of the world’s coal, about four billion tons of the stuff. America however is now using much less of it, with a decline of 20% between 2002 and 2012. Meanwhile China’s coal consumption grew by 160% over this period. China is now the world’s biggest consumer of energy and will remain so for a long time. In contrast American energy consumption is lower today than it was a decade ago. While China’s primary energy consumption increased by 150% in a single decade, America’s declined by 4%.

 

 

Reference
 

         Current and Future Energy Sources of the USA. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2018, from https://www.e-education.psu.edu/egee102/node/1930

         What is Energy. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2018, from https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=about_home

U.S. Energy Information Administration – EIA – Independent Statistics and Analysis. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2018, from https://www.eia.gov/beta/international/analysis.cfm?iso=CHN

America Versus China: The New Reality Of Global Energy. (2014, May 12). Retrieved January 26, 2018, from http://www.theenergycollective.com/robertwilson190/380971/america-versus-china-what-difference-decade-makes

Americans use Many types of Energy. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2018, from https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=us_energy_home