Psychology Question Bank – 556 MCQs on “Behaviour” – Part 5

(b) Fugue

(c) Systematized Amnesia

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(d) Somnabulism

(e) Conversion Hysteria

402. When a hysteric patient suddenly becomes aware of his loss of memory, he is supposed to suffer from:

(a) Fugue

(b) Somnabulism

(c) Localized Amnesia

(d) Conversion Hysteria

(e) Phobia

403. When a patient forgets each successive event as it occurs, he is supposed to suffer from:

(a) Systematized Amnesia

(b) Localized Amnesia

(c) Conversion Hysteria

(d) Continuous Amnesia

(e) Somnabulism

404. When dissociative reactions involve repre­ssion, it takes place in:

(a) Unconscious level

(b) Conscious level

(c) Subconscious level

(d) Both in Conscious and Unconscious level

405. Kanzer reported a case where a married woman asked the policeman to take her home as she could not say who she was. But application of hypnosis and sedative drugs revealed her marital unhappiness and love for another man. In her unconscious level, she wanted to forget home in which she was living as it was very unpleasant to her. This is a case of:

(a) Fugue

(b) Amnesia

(c) Somnabulism

(d) Multiple Personality

(e) Dual Personality

406. The example of Sally, the saint, the woman and the devil illustrated by Morton Prince reveal the case of:

(a) Amnesia

(b) Multiple Personality

(c) Dual personality

(d) Fugue

(e) None of the above

407. The story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hide reveals the case of:

(a) Dual Personality

(b) Somnabulism

(c) Multiple Personality

(d) Fugue

(e) None of the above

408. Who viewed that multiple personality may develop as an escape from the monotony, strains, drudgery and responsibilities of life?

(a) Goddard

(b) Sigmund Freud

(c) C.G. Jung

(d) G. W. Allport

(e) None of the above

409. In which type of hysteric reactions a physical incapacity appears without any physical basis?

(a) Fugue

(b) Conversion Hysteria

(c) Amnesia

(d) Dissociative Hysteria

(e) None of the above

410. Conversion reactions are generally found among:

(a) Adolescents and young adults

(b) Old men and women

(c) Children

(d) Men

(e) None of the above

411. The most primary diagnostic signs of hysterical neurosis is :

(a) Hyposthenia

(b) Anaesthesia

(c) Paresthesia

(d) Hypersthenia

(e) None of the above

412. The most prominent symptom which was found in many soldiers during second world war was:

(a) Tactual Anaesthesia

(b) Hyposthenia

(c) Paresthesia

(d) Aphonia

(e) Amnesia

413. When a hysteric patient cannot write but can use the same muscles for knitting or playing musical instrument, it is popularly known as:

(a) Writer’s Cramp

(b) Hyposthenia

(c) Analgesia

(d) Amnesia

414. The inability to stand and walk is known as:

(a) Hysterical fits

(b) Hyposthenia

(c) Astasia-abasia

(d) Amnesia

(e) None of the above

415. A forty year old woman felt badly treated and neglected by her husband. This has been particularly aggravated following the separation of two grown up children from home. After a number of quarrels and agree scenes with her husband, she suddenly developed disturbance in speech which is known as:

(a) Amnesia

(b) Aphonia

(c) Anaesthesia

(d) Astasia-abasia

(e) Hypersthenia

416. Hysterical fits and convulsions always take place:

(a) In the presence of other people

(b) In the absence of other people

(c) At anytime and in any place

(d) Particularly when the patient is in home

(e) None of the above

417. Pseudo Cyesis or Phantom pregnancy is a common example of:

(a) Autonomic Conversion

(b) Dissociative Reaction

(c) Tremers

(d) Tics

(e) None of the above

418. In conversion reaction, vomiting signifies:

(a) Regression

(b) Projection

(c) Repressed Disgust

(d) Identification

(e) Displacement

419. Anrexia Nervosa where the dysfunction occurs in eating behaviour is a symptom of:

(a) Autonomic Conversion

(b) Dissociative Reaction

(c) Amnesia

(d) Phobia

(e) None of the above

420. The vascomotor disturbances of hysterically paralysed limbs are otherwise known as:

(a) Tropic Symptoms

(b) Annexia Nervosa

(c) Astasia-abasia

(d) Amnesia

(e) Paresthesia

421. Who has emphasized on the role of emotion in the causation of hysteria?

(a) Sigmund Freud

(b) Dejerine

(c) Janet

(d) G. W. Allport

(e) Alfred Adler

422. “Hysterical symptoms are memory traces of sexual traumata – the hysteric suffers from reminiscences” – Who believed in the above fact?

(a) Janet

(b) Sigmund Freud

(c) C.G. Jung

(d) Alfred Adler

(e) G. W. Allport

423. Who held that hysteria is a malady of the synthesis of personality?

(a) Sigmund Freud

(b) Janet

(c) G. W. Allport

(d) Alfred Adler

(e) C. G Jung

424. In conversion hysteria, the repressed wishes are converted into a symptom in such a way that:

(a) Unconscious conflict is avoided or reduced

(b) Conscious conflict is avoided or reduced

(c) Subconscious conflict is avoided or reduced

(d) Anxiety and tension are reduced

(e) None of the above

425. It is true that a hysteric patient gains sym­pathy from the family members and friends and he does not have to face the real life situation and solve varied problems of life. Thus, this helps in:

(a) The escape from reality

(b) Inviting conflicts

(c) Developing personality problems

(d) Developing secondary personality

(e) None of the above

426. Amnesia can be cured by:

(a) Chemotherapy

(b) Hypnosis

(c) Methodological questioning

(d) Behaviour therapy

(e) None of above

427. A personality disorder characterised by immaturity, self-dramatisation, seductive­ness and attention seeking is popularly known as:

(a) Histrionic personality disorder

(b) Schizophrenia

(c) Manic-depressive Psychosis

(d) Phobia

(e) Anxiety Neurosis

428. A person’s desire to be in other person’s company is called:

(a) Extroversion

(b) Affiliation

(c) Socialization

(d) Introversion

(e) None of the above

429. The concept of Adaptation Syndrome was introduced by the Canadian physiologist:

(a) Hans Selye in 1936

(b) Sigmund Freud in 1910

(c) Alfred Adler in 1907

(d) C. G. Jung in 1906

(e) None of the above

430. Automatic repetition of another person’s words is known as:

(a) Ecopraxia

(b) Echolalia

(c) Homeostasis

(d) Aphonia

(e) Phobia

431. The theory that behaviour is aimed at attainment of pleasure and avoidance of pain is known as:

(a) Field theory

(b) Psychoanalytic theory

(c) Hedonism

(d) Hallo Effect

(e) None of the above

432. A general impression about the way a person’s actions and personal qualities are perceived under shortage of information about that person is called:

(a) Hallo Effect

(b) Hedonism

(c) Hallucination

(d) Habituation

(e) None of the above

433. Inability to walk due to impairment in motor coordination is known as:

(a) Abasia

(b) Amnesia

(c) Phobia

(d) Aphonia

(e) None of the above

434. The discharge of tension by words, feelings and action as a traumatic experience is called:

(a) Absorption

(b) Abreaction

(c) Abasia

(d) Amnesia

(e) None of the above

435. The state of preoccupation or high degree of attention to one object or activity is called:

(a) Astasia-Abasia

(b) Amnesia

(c) Absorption

(d) Abreaction

(e) None of the above

436. The trend in psychoanalysis that developed in response to orthodox Freudianism is popularly known as:

(a) Military Psychology

(b) Individual Psychology

(c) Analytical Psychology

(d) Ego Psychology

(e) None of the above

437. Comprehension of the emotional states of another person through common emotional experience is called:

(a) Empathy

(b) Trauma

(c) Egocentrism

(c) Egoism

(e) Eidetism

438. The doctrine according to which psyche plays no active role in the life and activity of man is known as:

(a) Epiphenomenalism

(b) Equilibrium

(c) Individualism

(d) Behaviourism

(e) Collectivism

439. The state of complacency and unconcern that runs counter to objective circumstances and is found to involve mimic and general locomotor animation is popularly known as :

(a) Euphoria

(b) Excitation

(c) Ethology

(d) Epiphenomenalism

(e) Ergonomics

440. The method suggested by Ludwig Bins- wanger for analysing personality in the totality and uniqueness of his/her existence is called:

(a) Field Research

(b) Existential analysis

(c) Forensic Psychology

(d) Freudo-Marxism

(e) None of the above

441. The psychological state arising because of some real or imaginary obstacle to achieve a goal is called:

(a) Frustration

(b) Anxiety

(c) Conflict

(d) Emotional Strain

(e) None of the above

442. A trend which studies consciousness proce­sses from the view point of their functions in adapting the body to the environment is known as:

(a) Analytical Psychology

(b) Individual Psychology

(c) Functional Psychology

(d) Gestalt Psychology

(e) None of the above

443. The highest level of development of man’s abilities, both of general (intellectual) and specified ones is called:

(a) Genotype

(b) Geniality

(c) Creativity

(d) Intelligence

(e) Capacity

444. The sumtotal of all the genes localized in the chromosomes of a given organism is called:

(a) Creativity

(b) Heredity

(c) Endocrinology

(d) Geotype

(e) None of the above

445. The realised image of an anticipated result to whose achievement human action is directed is called:

(a) Motive

(b) Goal

(c) Drive

(d) Need

(e) None of the above

446. The process due to which the subject is individually represented in the life of other people and can come out in social life as a personality is known as:

(a) Personalisation

(b) Socialization

(c) Affiliation

(d) Gregariousness

(e) None of the above

447. The act of ascribing human properties of animals, plants, abstract concepts, intimate objects and natural phenomena is known as:

(a) Personification

(b) Personality orientation

(c) Persuability

(d) Personalization

(e) None of the above

448. The psychological defence whereby one individual unconsciously ascribes to another person’s motivations, features and properties inherent in his own personality is popularly known as:

(a) Projection

(b) Personification

(c) Identification

(d) Reaction Formation

(e) Psychodrama

449. The selective disposition of an individual towards a given activity and inducing him to engage in that activity is otherwise called:

(a) Propensity

(b) Psychogenetics

(c) Psychobiography

(d) Psychodiagnosis

(e) Psychic state

450. A form of group psychotherapy in which patients take turns as actors and spectators is popularly known as:

(a) Psychodrama

(b) Chemotherapy

(c) Psychoprophylaxis

(d) Psycholinguistics

(e) Psychogenics

451. In early days, Hysteria was believed as a disease of the:

(a) Brain

(b) Hand

(c) Womb

(d) Spinal Cord

(e) None of the above

452. Hysteria may be regarded as:

(a) Speech Disorder

(b) Brain Disorder

(c) Personality Disorder

(d) Endocrine Disorder

(e) None of the above

453. Which neurotic disorder may be compared with a sewing machine which has gone out of order needing just cleaning and not like a machine which has broken and cannot be put into order by cleaning?

(a) Hysteria

(b) Manic Depressive Psychosis

(c) Phobia

(d) Anxiety Neurosis

(e) None of the above

454. The neurotic syndrome that comprises conversion reactions and dissociative reactions is known as:

(a) Manic Depressive Psychosis

(b) Schozophrenia

(c) Hysteria

(d) Phobia

(e) None of the above

455. The type of Neurosis characterised by involuntary psychogenic of motor or sensory function is called:

(a) Obsessive Compulsive Neurosis

(b) Phobia

(c) Anxiety Neurosis

(d) Hysterical Neurosis

(e) None of the above

456. A mild degree of excessive elaton is called:

(a) Hypoergasia

(b) Hypoesthesia

(c) Hypoanalysis

(d) Hypomania

(e) Hypothesis

457. Decreased sensitivity to stimuli is known as:

(a) Hypnotherapy

(b) Hypnophobia

(c) Hypoesthesia

(d) Hypochondria

(e) Hypomania

458. Use of hypnosis in psychoanalytic therapy to facilitate uncovering of unconscious material is known as:

(a) Hypnophobia

(b) Hypoanalysis

(c) Hypochondira

(d) Hypomania

(e) Hypovolenia

459. Sleep learning is otherwise known as:

(a) Hypochondria

(b) Hypoesthesia

(c) Hypnopaedia

(d) Hypomania

(e) Hypovolemia

460. Temporary state of consciousness characte­rised by sharp decrease of its span and concentration on the content of suggestion is known as:

(a) Hypothesis

(b) Hypnosis

(c) Hyperfunction

(d) Hypomania

(e) None of the above

461. Treatment of illness by hypotism is called:

(a) Psychotherapy

(b) Hypotherapy

(c) Physiotherapy

(d) Chemotherapy

(e) None of the above

462. Excessive motor restlessness is otherwise known as :

(a) Hypomania

(b) Hypnosis

(c) Hypoxia

(d) Hyperkinesis

(e) None of the above

463. Unusual and pathological sharpening of memorising, retention and recall is called:

(a) Hyperamnesia

(b) Hypomania

(c) Hypoxia

(d) Hypnosis

(e) None of the above

464. The dram like state of highetened sugges­tibility induced in a subject by a hypnosist is called:

(a) Hypertonic

(b) Hypoxia

(c) Hypnotic Trance

(d) Hypomania

(e) None of the above

465. A condition of over activity in children is known as:

(a) Hypomania

(b) Hypoxia

(c) Hyperkinesis

(d) Hysteria

(e) None of the above

466. Fear of sleep is otherwise known as:

(a) Zoophobia

(b) Hypnobhobia

(c) Hypomania

(d) Hyper function

(e) Hygrophobia

467. Impaired sensitivity to pain is called:

(a) Hypalgesia

(b) Hypomania

(c) Hylophobia

(d) Hypegiaphobia

(e) None of the above

468. When there is a violent contraction of a group of muscles of a wide area produced by the action of the Central Nervous System, it is called:

(a) Amnesia

(b) Tic

(c) Anosmia

(d) Convulsion

(e) Aphonia

469. A quick and sudden spasm like voluntary movements is known as:

(a) Contraction

(b) Tic

(c) Conversion

(d) Convulsion

(e) Cramps

470. Violent contraction of some nerves is known as:

(a) Cramps

(b) Conversion

(c) Tic

(d) Amnesia

(e) Hypnomania

471. Lack of mental synthesis, integration and adjustment is otherwise called:

(a) Disorder

(b) Dissociation

(c) Convulsion

(d) Conversion

(e) Amnesia

472. Dissociative hysterical neuroses are of four types, namely:

(a) Amnesia, figure, somnabulsim and multiple personality

(b) Conversion, projection, amnesia and phobia

(c) Convulsion, phobia, amnesia and fugue

(d) Fugue, Dual personality, Amnesia and Phobia

(e) None of the above

473. Hypesthesia is generally found in:

(a) Schizophrenia

(b) Phobia

(c) Conversion Hysteria

(d) Dissociative Hysteria

(e) None of the above

474. Blurred vision is a general symptom in:

(a) Schizophrenia

(b) Phobia

(c) Manic Depressive Psychosis

(d) Conversion Hysteria

(e) None of the above

475. Writer’s Cramp is a symptom in:

(a) Phobia

(b) Schizophrenia

(c) Conversion Hysteria

(d) Dissociative Hysteria

(e) None of the above

476. When a person cannot write but is able to use the same muscles for other activities, for example, to shuffle a pack of cards or to play a musical instrument, he suffers from:

(a) Tics

(b) Tremors

(c) Writer’s Cramp

(d) Aphonia

(e) None of the above

477. Muscular shakings or tremblings are otherwise known as:

(a) Tremors

(b) Tics

(c) Aphonia

(d) Amnesia

(e) None of the above

478. Localised muscular twitches are called:

(a) Tics

(b) Tremors

(c) Nausea

(d) Ganser Syndrome

(e) None of the above

479. When a person speaks only in whispers, it seems that he suffers from:

(a) Acute Apendicitis

(b) Mutism

(c) Aphonia

(d) Nausea

(e) Belching

480. Escapism from reality protects the patient from anxiety in:

(a) Conversion Hysteria

(b) Dissociative Hysteria

(c) Schozophrenia

(d) Manic Depressive Psychosis

(e) Phobic Reactions

481. Amnesia involves:

(a) Loss of speech

(b) Loss of memory

(c) Loss of Sensation

(d) Loss of Vision

(e) None of the above

482. Somnabulism is popularly known as:

(a) Hand Washing

(b) Repeated Bathing

(c) Repeated Belching

(d) Sleepwalking

(e) None of the above

483. History reveals that during World War I & II, many soldiers were suffering from:

(a) Schizophrenia

(b) Conversion Hysteria

(c) Manic Depressive Psychosis

(d) Phobia

(e) Mental Retardation

484. Dissociative hysterical reactions are defined as:

(a) Departures from normal states of con­sciousness

(b) Departures from abnormal states

(c) Day to day frustrations

(d) Irrational fears

(e) None of the above

485. When a person flees from his usual surroun­dings frequently moving to a new geo­graphic location to start an entirely new life suffers from:

(a) Phobia

(b) Amnesia

(c) Fugue

(d) Dual personality

(e) None of the above

486. C. G. Jung called human personality as:

(a) The complexes

(b) The Psyche

(c) The collective unconscious

(d) The persona

(e) The shadow

487. Who was formulated the concepts of Intro­version and Extroversion?

(a) Sigmund Freud

(b) C. G. Jung

(c) Alfred Adler

(d) Eysenk

(e) Cattell

488. Who was the inventor of Sixteen Personality Factor Test (16 P.F. Test)?

(a) C.G. Jung

(b) Alfred Adler

(c) Cattell

(d) Eysenk

(e) Sigmund Freud

489. “Personality is the sum total of the actual or potential behaviour patterns of an organism as determined by heredity and environment” – Who has given the above definition of Personality?

(a) Eysenk

(b) C.G. Jung

(c) Alfred adler

(d) G. W. Allport

(e) None of the above

490. Who was the founder of the International Psychoanalytical Foundation?

(a) Cattell

(b) C.G. Jung

(c) Sigmund Freud

(d) Alfred Adler

(e) G. W. Allport

491. Who developed the concept of “Collective Unconscious”?

(a) Sigmund Freud

(b) C. G. Jung

(c) Alfred Adler

(d) G. W. Allport

(e) Cattell

492. Psychoneuroses usually arise out of:

(a) Morbid fears and anxieties

(b) Emotional disturbances

(c) Hereditary principles

(d) Complex patterns of behaviour

(e) Brain disorders

493. Who opined that many reactions which we should look as neurotic in our culture are considered quite normal in other cultures and behaviour types which we consider quite usual would be considered neurotic at sometimes and in some places?

(a) Sigmund Freud

(b) C. G. Jung

(c) G. W. Allport

(d) Karen Horney

(e) None of the above

494. Who viewed that fear is the most important aspect of neurotic behaviour and it is gradually generalized to other aspects of behaviour?

(a) Sigmund Freud

(b) Wolpe

(c) C.G. Jung

(d) Duke and Nowicki (1979)

(e) None of the above

495. The central dynamic factor in neurosis is:

(a) Repression

(b) Regression

(c) Displacement

(d) Identification

(e) Sublimation

496. Repressed hostility is generally found in:

(a) Schizophrenia

(b) Neuroses

(c) Mental Retardation

(d) Psychoses

(e) None of the above

497. Ancient Greeks and Hippocrates believed that hysteria is a disorder restricted to:

(a) Women

(b) Both women and men

(c) Men

(d) Children

(e) Girls and boys

498. Who told that the basis of hysterical personality includes a child like immaturity, self centredness, poor insight, a notably weak psychic, integration and an extra­ordinarily high degree of suggestibility?

(a) Coleman (1981)

(b) Mc Call (1963)

(c) Skinner (1948)

(d) Rachmann (1972)

(e) Janet 91925)

499. Hysterical neuroses can be divided into two general types, namely:

(a) Convulsion and Regression

(b) Dissociative and Conversion

(c) Repression and Regression

(d) Illusion and Delusion

(e) None of the above

500. Who defined hysteria as a neurotic defence in which symptoms of some physical illness appear without any organic pathology?

(a) Janet (1925)

(b) Coleman (1981)

(c) Enderson (1935)

(d) Lewis (1935)

Answers

401. (c) 402. (c) 403. (d) 404. (a) 405. (b) 406. (b) 407. (a) 408. (a) 409. (b) 410. (a) 411. (b) 412. (a) 413. (a) 414. (c) 415. (b) 416. (a) 417. (a) 418. (c) 419. (a) 420. (a) 421. (b) 422. (b) 423. (b) 424. (a) 425. (a) 426. (c) 427. (a) 428. (b) 429. (a) 430. (b) 431. (c) 432. (a) 433. (a) 434. (b) 435. (c) 436. (a) 437. (a) 438. (a) 439. (a) 440. (b) 441. (a) 442. (c) 443. (b) 444. (d) 445. (a) 446. (a) 447. (a) 448. (a) 449. (a) 450. (a) 451. (c) 452. (c) 453. (a) 454. (c) 455. (d) 456. (d) 457. (c) 458. (b) 459. (c) 460. (b) 461. (b) 462. (d) 463. (a) 464. (c) 465. (c) 466. (b) 467. (a) 468. (d) 469. (b) 470. (a) 471. (b) 472. (a) 473. (c) 474. (d) 475. (c) 476. (c) 477. (a) 478. (a) 479. (c) 480. (a) 481. (b) 482. (d) 483. (b) 484. (a) 485. (c) 486. (b) 487. (b) 488. (c) 489. (a) 490. (c) 491. (b) 492. (a) 493. (d) 494. (b) 495. (a) 496. (b) 497. (a) 498. (b) 499. (b) 500. (b)

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